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Thread: Newbie question about BJ books

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    Newbie question about BJ books

    I am beginner, I have 2 books "Professional Blackjack" and "Blackjack Attack", from those books what chapters should I study the most. It's so much information.

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    Read both from the first page to the last. You need to understand the history and development of card counting and the math and magic of blackjack. When you get thru those 2 books I can recommend 4 more.

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    How much of a beginner are you, being a forum member for 9 years?

    I suggest concentrating on Prof BJ, learning BS, index deviations, and bet ramping for the rules at the casinos you play. This assumes you've already mastered HiLo. BJA is not a beginner's book.

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    I know I lost interest. I am more focus now. Wow I know right, 9 years ago, if I would of stuck with it I would be much far along.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zbest1966 View Post
    I am beginner, I have 2 books "Professional Blackjack" and "Blackjack Attack", from those books what chapters should I study the most. It's so much information.
    Wong’s book is best if use hi lo or halves. Away from
    home, so close to very close
    hi lo - about page 250 - master the tables
    halves - about page 275 - master the tables
    Early and late surrender - around page 92.

    BJ Attack is important but designed for seasoned or soon to be seasoned players. Your 3rd book should be Snyders Blackbelt in Blackjack. Needs to read several times. Filled with great nuggets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zbest1966 View Post
    I know I lost interest. I am more focus now. Wow I know right, 9 years ago, if I would of stuck with it I would be much far along.
    This isn't for you. You have to be motivated and interested.

    Do something you enjoy.

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    Sometimes it depends on where your life is at. I bought all the books 16 years ago and learned the Red 7 count, but had a day job with long hours so never put in the hours of practice that it takes, and could never keep it straight in my head doing it “live” so let it go. Spent years “back counting,” reading and learning and watching without doing. Now I am retired, upgraded my count to UBZ2, have practiced and done drills daily for the better part of a year, and can do it successfully (if not perfectly). All the knowledge in the world is not enough; counting is a skill that takes practice, like driving or playing a musical instrument, and that is the part that takes both dedication and time.

    Also, studies have shown that you CAN teach an old dog new tricks, it just takes longer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BackCounter View Post
    All the knowledge in the world is not enough; counting is a skill that takes practice, like driving or playing a musical instrument, and that is the part that takes both dedication and time
    I would add there’s no substitute for real world/casino experience to show you how good your skills really are, and to appreciate the insights in BJA3. As soon as you have enough Bankroll and can play at an acceptable Risk-of-Ruin, go out and get some mileage at the tables. To take the musical instrument comparison one step further, your playing and musicality takes a leap forward once you join a band or orchestra.

    Best of luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BackCounter View Post
    Sometimes it depends on where your life is at. I bought all the books 16 years ago and learned the Red 7 count, but had a day job with long hours so never put in the hours of practice that it takes, and could never keep it straight in my head doing it “live” so let it go. Spent years “back counting,” reading and learning and watching without doing. Now I am retired, upgraded my count to UBZ2, have practiced and done drills daily for the better part of a year, and can do it successfully (if not perfectly). All the knowledge in the world is not enough; counting is a skill that takes practice, like driving or playing a musical instrument, and that is the part that takes both dedication and time.

    Also, studies have shown that you CAN teach an old dog new tricks, it just takes longer.
    It's a LIKE sport you have to be dedicated. Someone said if you want to be good at counting you have to at least 200 hrs of practice.

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