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Thread: Secondary count for insurance

  1. #1
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    Secondary count for insurance

    Hello,

    In Dynamic Blackjack, Richard Reid uses a secondary count for Aces. OK
    To improve insurance decision, he suggests to muliply the number of Aces seen by two (EBJ II is a balanced second level count) and add it to the running count before doing the true count conversion. OK
    His example seems clear.

    But what I don't understand is how he can uses the same index (+6)

    As a reminder, you can found that very interesting book for free in subscription forums.

    Phoebe
    Last edited by Phoebe; 12-01-2019 at 10:45 AM.

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  3. #3


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful. Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No
    As I wrote you privately, his description of what to do when side counting aces is correct. His description of what to do for a secondary count makes no sense at all.

    In his example of RC = -3 with three decks gone and 13 aces seen, you should have seen 12 aces, so the pack is deficient one ace. Therefore you ADD four to the RC of -3, which yields +1. The TC is, therefore, 1/3 = 0.333, and you most certainly do NOT take insurance.

    I have no idea what Richard was thinking, but his example for the secondary count is all wrong. Imagine if you had seen 12 aces to that point, which is exactly normal. He would have you add 24 to -3, yielding +21. TC would be 21/3 = +7, and he would have you insure. Completely wrong.

    Don
    Last edited by DSchles; 12-01-2019 at 05:49 PM.

  4. #4


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    Quote Originally Posted by DSchles View Post
    As I wrote yo u privately, his description of what to do when side counting aces is correct. His description of what to do for a secondary count makes no sense at all.

    In his example of RC = -3 with three decks gone and 13 aces seen, you should have seen 12 aces, so the pack is deficient one ace. Therefore you ADD four to the RC of -3, which yields +1. The TC is, therefore 1/3 = 0.333, and you most certainly so NOT take insurance.

    I have no idea what Richard was thinking, but his example for the secondary count is all wrong. Imagine if you had seen 12 aces to that point, which is exactly normal. He would have you add 24 to -3, yielding +21. TC would be 21/3 = +7, and he would have you insure. Completely wrong.

    Don
    I take pride in my spelling and punctuation. I see at least 2 egregious errors above. I would further suggest that you do NOT display pride in your penmanship.

    Think I’ll take a screen shot and provide provide private remedial assistance.

  5. #5


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    Quote Originally Posted by Freightman View Post
    I take pride in my spelling and punctuation. I see at least 2 egregious errors above. I would further suggest that you do NOT display pride in your penmanship.

    Think I’ll take a screen shot and provide provide private remedial assistance.
    Further, I’ll just check on something - appears to be a third goof.

  6. #6


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    Quote Originally Posted by Freightman View Post
    I would further suggest that you do NOT display pride in your penmanship.
    It isn't penmanship; it's typing. I trust you know the difference between the two. But the typos are all mine; I didn't proofread. No excuses.

    Don

  7. #7


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    Quote Originally Posted by DSchles View Post
    It isn't penmanship; it's typing. I trust you know the difference between the two. But the typos are all mine; I didn't proofread. No excuses.

    Don
    Of course I know the difference and you don’t have to apologize. If nothing else, we’re all human beings and I couldn’t resist the opportunity. Which causes me to think - I seldom proofread my posts - yet, even with a typo, the meanings and 8ntents are generally pretty clear.

    See what I mean.

  8. #8


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    Quote Originally Posted by DSchles View Post
    It isn't penmanship; it's typing. I trust you know the difference between the two. But the typos are all mine; I didn't proofread. No excuses.

    Don
    For some of us, the errors are from "Swyping."

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swype

  9. #9


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    You aren't going to convince me that sloppiness is just fine, so there's little sense in trying. How many typos in one post are acceptable to you?

    It hsa ben rpoevn oevr and oevr agian taht as lnog as the frist and lsat lteters of wrods are crorcet, no ohter ltetres need be in tiher crorcet palce in odrer to udnretsnad the maennig.

    If you weren't able to read the above without even hesitating, then you're probably either a) illiterate, or b) not American.

    So does that mean we should all type like that?

    Don

  10. #10


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    Quote Originally Posted by Freightman View Post
    Which causes me to think - I seldom proofread my posts
    You had to tell us that, right? :-)

    Don

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