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Thread: Wonging

  1. #1


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    Wonging

    When a count goes negative early in an 8 deck shoe, what are some of the best excuses or pieces of advice to drop one/both hands?

  2. #2


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    Leave the table. make no excuses, just do your thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by refinery View Post
    Leave the table. make no excuses, just do your thing.
    A 6 deck shoe, sticking around isn’t necessarily the worst thing, especially when they’re no options. An 8 deck shoe on the other hand, can be a long and excruciating painful process to fight through.

    Interestingly enough, either scenario, if shoe is deeply cut, can still provide max bet opportunities. Really depends on where you are in the shoe when count tanks, wheather to stay or not.

  4. #4


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    If you can afford it, a negative ramp followed by short breaks might help. For example, you play $5 at TC -3, $10 at TC-2, $15 at TC-1, $20 at TC0, $25 at TC+1, $75 at TC+2, $100 at TC +3, and $150 at all higher counts.

    Otherwise, first time below TC-2, stand by your spot and text. Use an act for another phone break. Bathroom break if negative TC persists, return at end of shoe. Leave only if plenty of other tables available.

    Ensure you are not being paranoid, usually at red chip 8 deck tables, no one cares and interest only goes up if you are placing $50+ bets and have a huge pile of chips.

  5. #5


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    Quote Originally Posted by refinery View Post
    Leave the table. make no excuses, just do your thing.
    Agree. Don't think you need to explain your casino actions to others players , dealers, etc. Just do it.

  6. #6


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    Quote Originally Posted by refinery View Post
    Leave the table. make no excuses, just do your thing.
    Agree. But one good trick is to pretend to be a smoker...if you don't like the current count, make a fuss about needing a smoke. Stand back from the table, pretend to smoke, then rejoin whenever you like. Smokers are known to be impulsive, have the craving etc. Works well. Pit and other players don't care...real smokers do it all the time.

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    I never could pretend that. Au contraire, I would prefer playing in non-smoking areas of casinos, if there are any.

  8. #8


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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeeBabar View Post
    If you can afford it, a negative ramp followed by short breaks might help. For example, you play $5 at TC -3, $10 at TC-2, $15 at TC-1, $20 at TC0, $25 at TC+1, $75 at TC+2, $100 at TC +3, and $150 at all higher counts.

    Otherwise, first time below TC-2, stand by your spot and text. Use an act for another phone break. Bathroom break if negative TC persists, return at end of shoe. Leave only if plenty of other tables available.

    Ensure you are not being paranoid, usually at red chip 8 deck tables, no one cares and interest only goes up if you are placing $50+ bets and have a huge pile of chips.
    Zee
    Actually, for a person who has a bloated bankroll for the stakes played, you have a really good strategy, but a real lousy execution.

    First, let’s fix your spread, especially since you have to compensate for raising your bets in a minus count. First, your game likely has a .5% edge at +1, and your jump to $25 is fine. And then, you jump to $75 at+2, which is great - you’ve tripled your bet, though you’ve only doubled your edge to 1% (helps compensate for raising bets in a losing range). Then, you’ve slowed down your ramp to $100 at + 3 to a 33% growth, while your operating margin has increased 50% over +2 - a clear underbet. And then you max out at $150, a 1-6 spread for anything at +4 and over. Think about this and rethink your ramp.

    This really restricts your profitability. Once in a while, Ill play a $10 min shoe game. I’ll play $25 off the top, dropping to whatever I feel like in neg counts worse than -2, jump all around in questionable marginal counts, and then really jam it - likely changing bets by the hand. I’ll get up to 250 to 400 (400 rare at $10 game). The strategy will reduce SCORE, but is highly effective and profitable, compensated by huge effective true spread.

  9. #9


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful. Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No
    Don’t play negative counts on shoe games. It’s a waste of time. Don’s chapter on Optimal Departure was really helpful.

  10. #10


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    Quote Originally Posted by EyeBRollin View Post
    Don’t play negative counts on shoe games. It’s a waste of time. Don’s chapter on Optimal Departure was really helpful.
    Yes. If you understand it.

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